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New Year’s Eve. United States Celebrated New Year in March until the 18th Century

New Year’s Eve. United States Celebrated New Year in March until the 18th Century
ISartosa
New Year’s Eve. United States Celebrated New Year in March until the 18th Century

Fireworks. Photo attribution Ronald Carlson

New Year’s Eve curiosities. Did you know that the United States Celebrated New Year in March until the 18th Century?

The early Roman calendar (it was a lunar system that became wildly inaccurate) designated March 1 as the New Year.

Thus, the first time the New Year was celebrated on January 1st was in Rome in 153 B.C. It was moved from March to January because it was the beginning of the civil year, when the two newly elected Roman consuls began their tenure. But this New Year date was not always widely observed.

In 46 B.C. Julius Caesar introduced a solar calendar, and January 1 became the consistently observed start of the New Year.

Maybe you also like this post: Pope Francis. 15 Good Points to Counter the 15 Illnesses of the Roman Curia.

In medieval Europe, the celebration was considered pagan, and the New Year was on Dec. 25, the birth of Jesus.

In 1582, the Gregorian calendar reform restored January 1 as New Year’s Day Of course, most Catholic countries adopted the Gregorian calendar immediately, but it was only slowly adopted among Protestant countries. For example, until the 18th century, the British Empire —and their American colonies— still celebrated the New Year in March.

Enjoy your day, Yareah friends. Art is everywhere and up to you. Happy New Year 2015!

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